FRACTION  CHARTS

Here are a few fraction charts.
Study them and make some notes if you need to.
The better you understand them,
the more fun you will have in our play area.

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In the chart to the left there are a total of 16 boxes. They are all covered in blue. Using fractions that would mean 16/16 are covered in blue. With the top number and the bottom number being the same. The fraction equals a whole number.

 

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In the chart to the left only 8 of the boxes are covered in blue, the other 8 are covered in yellow.
Using fractions we see that 8 of the 16 are yellow (or 8/16).
If you reduce this fraction, you will see that 8/16 is equal to 2/4 or 1/2.
So if you are trying to add the fractions, it is important to think in lines of a chart.
It will help you to understand how  the fractions can add up.
For example. 8/16 + 1/2 = 1

 

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In this chart, 15 of the boxes are yellow.
That would make this fraction 15/16.
This is one of those fractions that you can not reduce.
To use this fraction in math, you would need to adjust the other fractions to work with this one.
Example: 15/16 - 1/2 = ?
If you use the box, you will see that the 1/2 = 8/16.
Now you can do the math.
The problem is now 15/16 - 8-16 = ?
OK, what is 15-8=? The answer is 7.
Apply that to the fractions your answer would be 7/16.br>15/16 - 1/2 = 7/16

 

 One more quick chart

Now, you see fractions are not as hard as you thought they were.

If you would like to know more about Fractions? Just ask your math teacher.

Your math teacher is there to work with you and wants to see you do well.

Let them help!

Who knows, you might even find math to be a lot of fun.

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